Sunday, 15 January 2017

Books: The Hits and Misses of 2016

Anyone who knows me well, will know that I always have at least one book on the go at any one time. In 2016, I set myself a Reading Challenge of 24 books, which I actually surpassed. I also started listening to Audio books this year - a great way to spend my hour commute.



Fiction Hits
I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes: this seems to be a bit of a Marmite book, but I loved this action packed thriller which no doubt will also make a fantastic film.

The Bees by Laline Paull: set in a beehive, this book about a bee who breaks out of her allocated role is brilliant.

The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters: a wonderful ghost story.

The Fishermen by Chigozie Obioma: (2015 Man Booker shortlist): the story of four brothers and how they are affected by a curse after fishing in a forbidden river.

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman: a heart-warming story about a grumpy old man and his neighbourhood which has you laughing one minute and crying the next.

Us by David Nicholls: a couple on the verge of break-up who take their son on a European Grand Tour the summer before he starts uni. I read it in the summer before Albert went to uni so was quite poignant for me.

This Book Will Save Your Life by A.M. Homes: a very witty book about a man whose life suddenly changes one day due to a medical emergency and the resulting impact it has on his life.

At the Edge of the Orchard by Tracy Chevalier: I love Tracy Chevalier's writing - this is about a dysfunctional family trying to grow apples in the swamps of America.

Fiction Misses
Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee: This sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird just didn't do it for me. Disappointing.

My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante: The first in a trilogy that I thought I was going to love but actually hated.

Satin Island by Tom McCarthy: (2015 Man Booker shortlist) - it was so bad that I can't even remember what it was about. I just remember thinking it was pretentious.

J by Howard Jacobson: (2015 Man Booker shortlist) - I didn't hate this, but struggled to read it. I usually like dystopian novels but not this one.

A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James: (2015 Man Booker Prize Winner) - I tried reading it but resorted to the audiobook but it just didn't do it for me. There were far too many voices and it was just too bloody long!

Fiction: The Rest
The Tea Planter's Wife by Dinah Jefferies: This was a gift and not something I would usually read, but I did really enjoy it.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr: I enjoyed this book which is about a blind girl hiding a gem in St Malo in WWII, but thought it could have been so much shorter.

The Hand That First Held Mine by Maggie O'Farrell: I wanted to read this because someone told me it would make me cry. It didn't. Perhaps I read too much, but I found it a bit predictable.

Stone Mattress: Nine Tales by Margaret Atwood: I'm not usually a fan of short stories but the majority of these were great and all a little macabre.

Number 9 Dream by David Mitchell: It was a little difficult to separate the fantasy from the reality in Eiji's narration, but this is a great story.

Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey: About a lady with dementia who is convinced her friend is missing but uncovers the truth about her sister.

The Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier: This is a great book for quilters!

Etta and Otto and Russell and James by Emma Hooper: Etta journeys on foot from her home to the sea and her and Otto's love story enfolds.

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood: In a similar vein to Oryx and Crake, another dystopian novel from Atwood. Not quite up to her usual standard.

Our Man in Havana by Graham Greene: This felt very dated - not Graham Greene at his best.

Harvest by Jim Crace: An interesting tale about a new family that settle in the neighbourhood and how this becomes a catalyst for a whole heap of trouble.

A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler: (2015 Man Booker Shortlist) a good story, but again, Anne Tyler has written better.

The Driver's Seat by Muriel Spark: A disturbing little tale about Lise, an office worker who is taking a holiday but turns into something much more sinister.

Non-Fiction
Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science by Atul Gawande: I love a good medical book - absolutely fascinating.

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed: I watched the brilliant film with Reese Witherspoon before reading this. It was a joy to read of her hike across the Pacific Crest Trail.

So, what were your reading highlights from last year?

Love Mrs Jones x





2 comments:

  1. Great post - I love setting reading challenges. Are you on goodreads? I set myself a challenge of 24 last year - but only manaaged 17. I read A Man called Ove and loved it. I'd recommend the Readers of Broken Wheel by Katarina Bivald if you are looking for a good read. Your lists have given me some food for thought! x

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    Replies
    1. Excellent, I will check that one out, Catherine.

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